Here’s What’s Wrong With Walmart’s Web-Based Operations, Per A New Report

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According to a relatively recent study from the likes of eMarketer, one of the world’s leading market research firms specializing in web-based commercial activity, digital marketing, and media, Walmart is the third-largest web-based, e-commerce company in all of the United States.

Although Walmart’s sales, the metric by which the largest e-commerce retailers in the United States were stacked up by eMarketer, made up just 4.6 percent of retail e-commerce sales in 2019, its market share had increased consistently from 2017 to 2019 by factors of 0.7 percent from 2017 to 2018 and 0.6 percent from 2018 to 2019.

Amazon, on the other hand, is objectively, by leaps and bounds, both the largest online retailer in the United States and across the planet. Even though Amazon has a much greater, firmer grip on the consumer retail e-commerce market than its big-box, in-person retail counterpart – none other than Walmart, of course – this hasn’t led Walmart astray from giving its toughest competitor – Amazon – a run for its many.

Walmart has invested significantly into its e-commerce operations, going as far as sinking some $3.3 billion into its e-commerce superintendency in purchasing Jet.com, a popular online retailer, in order to beef up the threat that it posed to Amazon.

Despite countless other investments like its acquisition of Jet.com, Walmart hasn’t managed to generate worthwhile returns thus far, according to the company’s own financial statistics. For example, the online business publication Recode recently published a report that indicated that Walmart is soon to officially forecast losses in its upcoming fiscal year to the tune of more than one billion dollars, and that’s only for the company’s e-commerce line of business in the United States.

This major anticipated loss is of serious concern for Walmart considering that its United States-based e-commerce proceedings in the upcoming year are thought to come in the form of a range from $21 to $22 billion.

Recode also went on to say in its industry-impressing report that one of the most serious issues plaguing Walmart right now is that the company does not have enough liquid cash on hand that it can use to sink into assets that are of big-time value for its future commercial welfare. Amazon, on the other hand, is so successful, among several other reasons, because it does, in fact, have enough cash to cash-flow such initial cash layouts in buying into investments.

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